Dec 292012
 

Hey folks,

Now that I’ve done the character design for Chinyelu (for now, it could always change), I thought it might be nice to post a quick tutorial on how to make a short fro like hers in Inkscape.

When I first tried making a short fro, I used the method in my previous Afro tutorial, and it didn’t work very well at all.  For very short styles, the individual curls aren’t as visible, so it’s better to just give an impression of how they look rather than actually drawing each hair.

Ok here’s how Chinyelu looks with no hair:

short fro 1

To start all we need to do is add the basic shape of the hair, closely following the contours of her head.  Note that I have also added a slight blur (about 1.5).  I also set the opacity to about 75% so her skin still shows through slightly.  This can be adjusted depending on how long the hair is and what works for the image background and skin tone.

short fro 2

The “trick” to this is in the next step.   Continue reading »

Aug 162012
 

I just got back from the “Business of Africana in the Popular Arts” panel at Onyxcon!  It was great to learn from more experienced artists. Even though they didn’t have someone who worked in video games, I found that most of what was said applies to me as well.  This was also my first experience doing any real marketing for Nia’s Journey, although I actually hadn’t planned on it at all.  Next time I’ll have to bring flyers!

One of the biggest questions I left thinking about was how I define success?  Each of the panelists had their own perspective on this topic, and now that this game is moving forward more rapidly, it’s something I need to consider.

For Nia’s Journey, my goal is for players to feel like they are part of the adventure.  I want to make a world that feels real, regardless of the technical limitations of the RPG Maker engine.  When I first started working on this, my motivation was to make a game where people of color, and especially women of color could see themselves represented as leaders and heroes, instead of as sidekicks, token characters, or most commonly, not at all.  Representation is still important to me.  But somewhere along the way, I realized that I’m capable of doing much more.  When it’s done, Nia’s Journey won’t be known for being a “Black” or “Afrocentric” RPG.  It will be known for having pushed the genre forward.